US gas prices have now dropped for 21 days in a row - the longest streak since the start of COVID

RayGravesGhost

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bayou obviously doesn't know anything about the gallup organization's bias

It easy to fool people when they know so little you don't have to fool them
 

BayouGator1995

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bayou obviously doesn't know anything about the gallup organization's bias

It easy to fool people when they know so little you don't have to fool them
You mean the Gallup Polls destroy your rather weak, incompetent narratives you plaster all over the boards. You're highly allergic to the truth that's for certain.
 

LinksGator

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OK...so AAA and others are lying gas prices haven't been falling for the past 3 weeks?
Funny, how you believe them when they report they're going higher though

Who's talking about polls? I thought trumpr supporters didn't believe in those things
(I guess they do if they support their narrative)

I'm talking about FACTS...the price of gasoline has been dropping

Why does a good thing like that seem to be want you don't want to hear?

Could it be because that info isn't good for your politics?
If you climb up 10 flights of stairs and then go down 1; you are still much higher than you started. If I charge you 3 times what I charged for an IQ test two months ago but only 2 times the original amount today; that is still inflated and the score of 80 will remain the same.
 
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RayGravesGhost

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Gallup isn't even a true polling organization anymore...

They've kind exited that business for the most part


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gallup_(company)
In 2012, Gallup incorrectly predicted that Mitt Romney would win the 2012 U.S. presidential election.[33] Following the results of the election, Gallup spent six months reviewing its methodology.[33] The company concluded that its methodology was flawed as it made too few phone calls in Eastern and Pacific time zones, overestimated the white vote, and relied on listed landline phones that skewed the sample to an older demographic.[33]

In July 2013, the United States Department of Justice and Gallup reached a $10.5 million settlement based upon allegations that the company violated the False Claims Act and the Procurement Integrity Act.[34][35][36] The complaint alleged that Gallup overstated its labor hours in proposals to the U.S. Mint and State Department for contracts and task orders to be awarded without competition.[34][35] The Department of Justice alleged that the agencies awarded contracts and task orders at falsely inflated prices.[34] The settlement also resolved allegations that Gallup engaged in improper employment negotiations with a then-Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) official, Timothy Cannon, for work and funding.[35][36] Michael Lindley, a former Gallup employee, originally made the allegations against Gallup under the False Claims Act.[36] Lindley received nearly $2 million of the settlement.[36] Under the settlement, there was no prosecution and no determination of liability.[34]

Gallup decided not to conduct horse-race polling of the 2016 U.S. presidential election to help Gallup focus on its consulting business.[37][38] Gallup officials said polling could still be accurate during the election, but the company decided to reallocate resources.[39] Gallup Editor-in-Chief Frank Newport told The Washington Post said Gallup felt polling the public on issues was a better use of resources.[40]
 

RayGravesGhost

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If you climb up 10 flights of stairs and then go down 1; you are still much higher than you started. If I charge you 3 times what I charged for an IQ test two months ago but only 2 times the original amount today; that is still inflated and the score of 80 will remain the same.


Did someone claim that in 3 weeks gas prices that took 8 months to rise to the level they are now had been fully resolved?

You've been crying about gas prices for months now...they're falling right now

HURRAY!!!
(Its really pretty simple)
 
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Did someone claim that in 3 weeks gas prices that took 8 months to rise to the level they are now had been fully resolved?

You've been crying about gas prices for months now...they're falling right now

HURRAY!!!
(Its really pretty simple)

joe-biden-blizzard.gif
 
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ghost_of_ukalum1988

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Where's the destruction in the economy?
You can make as many general claims as you want....doesn't make them true
Trillions of capital value has been obliterated in the financial markets since last fall, in case you haven't noticed. Hence, the inspiration for my avatar.
 

gatordad3

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Awww...bama wants gas prices to stay high

Real "patriot" LOL

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/oil-dropped-13-past-30-183807256.html
Oil has dropped 13% in the past 30 days. Where it goes next is key for the path of inflation
Will Daniel
Thu, July 7, 2022 at 2:38 PM

If inflation is in a wrestling match with the American consumer, the price of oil has been the backbreaker.

Snarled supply chains and the war in Ukraine led oil prices to record highs of $130 per barrel back in March. And in the months since, the surging cost of energy in America has been a key driver of sky-high consumer prices.

Oil’s rise caused a 49% year-over-year jump in gasoline costs in May, which helped to push inflation to a fresh four-decade high.

But there are signs the momentum is changing.

Oil prices have plummeted 13% over the past month, and the critical commodity is now down more than 20% from its 2022 peak. Gas prices, as measured by AAA, have dropped in response, falling from their June 16 record high of $5.01 per gallon to just $4.75 on Thursday.


Deutsche Bank strategist Jim Reid said in a Thursday research note that the dip was mainly a result of the increasing “prospect of a global slowdown or recession.”

That’s a worrying sign for consumers who fear an economic downturn, but oil is also a key factor in determining where inflation goes from here—and that remains the number one issue in the minds of most Americans, according to recent polling.

The only problem is energy industry analysts and investment banks are split when it comes to the path ahead for oil.

Some argue a recession will reduce consumers’ demand for oil, pushing prices lower. But others believe lagging investment in fossil fuel production could cause oil to stay higher for longer. The debate is raging on Wall Street, but what happens to the price of oil is undeniably critical for the future path of inflation in the U.S.

The U.S. remains oil-dependent​

Before jumping into analysts’ views on what lies ahead for oil, it’s important to discuss just how dependent the U.S. still is on black gold, and what that means for inflation.

Even as President Biden and other administration officials have pushed plans for renewable energy expansion this year, the reality is that America still runs on oil. In 2021, petroleum products alone accounted for 36% of U.S. energy consumption, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

And although energy prices only represent roughly 7.5% of the consumer price index (CPI), the most common measure of inflation, when the price of oil rises, it has a reverberating effect on everything from grocery store prices to airfares. That means maintaining a close eye on oil prices is critical when determining where inflation could be headed.

Analysts’ varying views​

When it comes to where oil prices go from here, analysts and investment banks have wildly different outlooks.

Some oil watchers say that the current price dip isn’t sustainable, while others are expecting prices to sink further in the second half of the year.

JPMorgan Chase analysts warned this week that oil prices could hit a “stratospheric” $380 per barrel if Russia were to cut its crude output in response to Western sanctions.

And considering the U.S. and its allies have been mulling a price cap on Russian oil—a ceiling on how much they will spend—at around $40 to $60 per barrel, the risks of a Russian response are rising.

“It’s a no-brainer that Russia won’t sell its oil at such a discount, even less so as they have customers that are happy to buy their oil at a discounted price,” Ipek Ozkardeskaya, a senior analyst at Swissquote Bank, told Fortune.

Russia recently leapfrogged Saudi Arabia to become China’s number one oil supplier after Western sanctions forced Putin to look for new buyers, and India has dramatically increased its spending on Russian energy over the past year as well.

“Therefore, the G7 leaders are barking to an empty space. As such, the upside risks [for oil] still exist, and we may see prices rebound,” Ozkardeskaya added.

UBS also raised its forecast for Brent crude oil, the international benchmark, to $104 per barrel from $95 per barrel this week, citing “ongoing supply disruptions” that have further tightened supply, and noting that “demand continues to hold up despite higher prices.”

The investment bank’s analysts, led by Henri Patricot, added that there is a risk that oil prices could rise even further owing to “underinvestment” in production capacity. UBS still believes the U.S. economy can avoid a recession this year, and the analysts noted that, historically, it takes a global recession for oil demand to dramatically decline.

Craig Brothers, senior portfolio manager and co-head of fixed income at Bel Air Investment Advisors, told Fortune that he believes the lack of investment in increased production will keep oil prices elevated moving forward as well.

“U.S. oil companies are investing less in exploration, with drilling activity down 20% from the 15-year average. We expect the supply-demand imbalance in energy to keep prices above long-run averages,” he said.

But not every investment bank and industry analyst is arguing oil prices could soar to new heights. Citigroup said earlier this week that crude oil could collapse to $65 per barrel by the end of 2022 if a recession reduces global demand.

And Alex Kuptsikevich, a senior market analyst at FxPro, told Fortune that there are signs that demand for oil is “running out of steam,” which could lead prices to fall further.

“History is also on the side of the bears,” he said. “The most significant reversals in oil over the last decade and a half have occurred precisely in the middle of the year, with the most notable examples in 2008 and 2014. This is also what we are seeing now.”
The lyrics relate more to BSC but this post was TLDR.


You talk about people, you don't even know
And you talk about places, you never go
You talk about your girl, from head to toe
I said your mouth's moving fast, and your brain's moving slow
 

Capt Ron 1

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I hope that you socialist libs are not looking for an apology from us...because when it takes over 100 to fill my tank, when it used to be mid 40's under Donald J Trump...you have a better chance of hell freezing over. When Brandon helps int get under 50...I will be right here giving praise. However, since I KNOW whAT MAKES FUEL PRICES GO UP AND DOWN...i CAN SAY THAT WITHOUT SOMETHING LIKE A NATURAL disASTER....IT WILL never HAPPEN
 

BamaFan1137

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To say nothing of the increased propensity of people driving off without paying.

It is happening more often. I'm actually surprised that this is the case. I figured gas stations would clamp down even harder on "pay before you pump" or paying at the pump with the price increases.

Surprisingly they haven't. Even more surprising, the gas stations by and large aren't making large efforts to prosecute the drive-offs.

Don't get any bright ideas on that last sentence. 😡...😉😂
 

NavigatorII

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It is happening more often. I'm actually surprised that this is the case. I figured gas stations would clamp down even harder on "pay before you pump" or paying at the pump with the price increases.

Surprisingly they haven't. Even more surprising, the gas stations by and large aren't making large efforts to prosecute the drive-offs.

Don't get any bright ideas on that last sentence. 😡...😉😂
Honestly I haven't seen a single station in years that doesn't require prepayment for fuel. Drive offs must be other states issues. ????
 
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BamaFan1137

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Honestly I haven't seen a single station in years that doesn't require prepayment for fuel. Drive offs must be other states issues. ????

The policy is pay before you pump...but the clerks, who are often the owners/managers are turning on the pumps if they just want to fill up and pay in the store afterwards.
 

BamaFan1137

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BTW the penalty in Florida, the last I heard, Alabama and in most states is that you pay fines, restitution and then you lose your license for 6 months to a year.